Fashion Revolution celebrates its fifth anniversary this year and commemorates the disaster in the Rana Plaza factory during Fashion Revolution Week 2018. On the 24th of April 2013 the factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1138 people and wounding thousands. This horrific event shook the fashion industry to its core and was the beginning of the largest fashion activism organisation ever. Fashion Revolution strives to mobilise the fashion industry, consumers and governments to keep asking this one simple question: Who Made My Clothes? 
Scroll down to read how I decided to advocate for Fashion Revolution Week.
Pictures by Tomas De Preter

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This year’s Fashion Revolution Week took place from the 23rd until the 29th of April. To show my support I decided to plan a sustainable fashion shoot this week at the breathtaking Royal Greenhouses in Laeken. A lot has changed since Fashion Revolution started their pursuit towards a fairer and safer industry. With the help of the fashion consumers they insisted safer working conditions for the workers and demanded transparency in the production chain of fashion brands.

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After the collapse more than 200 fashion brands signed the legally binding Accord on Fire and Building Safety. Because of this accord hundreds of factories in Bangladesh have become safer workplaces. Even though the infrastructure has improved the workers still face verbal and physical violence, crude punishments and sexual harassment. Minimum wages in Bangladesh have increased to 55 euro a month. It’s an improvement but this minimum wage still doesn’t equal a worthy living wage, forcing the workers to live in poverty.

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We can all make a difference

Because I’m a firm believer of sustainable and fair fashion I have created a new outfit post for you this week to celebrate Fashion Revolution Week. I’m convinced we can change the way the fashion industry works by carefully selecting the brands we buy from and cherishing our garments. That’s why I purchase clothing from sustainable brands and at second hand shops. I aim to only buy what I really need or absolutely adore and try to be creative with what I already own. You could be surprised what treasures are tucked away at the back of your wardrobe or what outfits you can put together when you’re feeling inspired.

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Posing at the Royal Greenhouses

This outfit post has a gorgeous backdrop: the Royal Greenhouses in Laeken. They’re open to the public once a year during the springtime when most flowers are in bloom. It’s definitely a must-see when you’re in Belgium. It was so remarkable I’ll probably pay a visit to the Greenhouses again next year. The Royal Greenhouses are open to the public until the 11th of May. You can find more information and opening hours here: http://open.monarchie.be/

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Wondering where I got these fabulous pieces? 
I’m wearing a Tencel blouse from Wunderwerk. The German brand produces fairly and uses ecologic fabrics. Needless to say I’m a big fan!

My skirt is a second hand find I bought in a small harbour town in Portugal, Viana do Castelo, three years ago when I was there for a photography workshop. Unfortunately I don’t remember the name of this little boutique.

Years ago I picked up this oversized, pastel jumper for a few euro in a second hand shop in Antwerp called Think Twice.

My earrings were a birthday present from my boyfriend. He lasercut them out of MDF in a maker lab. Isn’t that impressive (and the cutest thing you’ve seen this month)?

During my trip to the south of France a few weeks ago I bought some jewelry from local craftsmen and –women, including this ring.

O My Bag is a beautiful brand that makes leather accessories in a fair and sustainable way. Their leather is vegetable-tanned and therefore biodegradable.

I hope this outfit post inspires you to stand up against the fast fashion industry and be creative with what you own.

I promise to write you soon!

x Sive

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Posted by:sivec

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